TN agency yet to disclose results of survey that rated leadership

By Chris Butler | Tennessee Watchdog

NASHVILLE — More than five weeks have passed since the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation concluded an anonymous survey to learn how happy employees are with the leadership, but results aren’t forthcoming.

Is this a sign the results were bad?

TDEC Commissioner Robert Martineau suggested in a mass email that employees would know survey results in a short period of time.

“Once the data are in, we will share the results with the entire department so you can see for yourself how we are doing,” Martineau said in the email.

About 800 of TDEC’s 2,500 employees participated in the survey, said TDEC spokeswoman Kelly Brockman.

TDEC: More than five weeks have passed since the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation concluded an anonymous survey to learn how happy employees are with the leadership, but results still aren’t forthcoming.

Tennessee Watchdog received anonymous information last week suggesting TDEC management received lousy feedback, thus the reason for the slow results.

Tennessee Watchdog asked Brockman whether there was any truth to that claim.

Brockman didn’t touch upon that topic directly, but in an email said, “TDEC’s leadership team put considerable time into thoughtfully analyzing the results, which includes some constructive feedback on workplace engagement at TDEC.”

“I’m happy to provide you the results once that information goes out to our staff.”

The survey, Brockman went on, asked employees about ways for management to provide better communication and development options for staff.

Brockman did not say whether TDEC conducts such surveys annually.

Regardless of the results, feedback apparently goes both ways within the government agency. Feedback from management to employees is apparently communicated openly.

As Tennessee Watchdog reported last month, TDEC’s Water Quality deputy director under the Division of Water Resources criticized employees for “non-productive, non-work related activities during the work hours.”

Bob Martineau

Also, Water Resources Division Director Sandra K. Dudley, the Tennessee official most responsible for maintaining the quality of the state’s water and public works systems, reminded her own employees about how to use a toilet.

Dudley’s email included a warning that workers aren’t supposed to flush their shoes down the commodes at the department’s main offices in downtown Nashville, at the Tennessee Tower.

Dudley also advised employees not to flush ink pens and paper clips.

Contact Christopher Butler at chris@tennesseewatchdog.org. or follow him and submit story ideas on his official Facebook page.

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Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com, a columnist for the Forum News Service, and host of the Plain Talk Podcast which you can subscribe to by clicking here.

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