Tag Archives: special session

“The Pioneer Family” stands in front of the North Dakota State Capitol on July 14, 2016, in Bismarck. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

Saying Republicans Ignored Needy People in Budget Fix Is Lazy and Inaccurate

Saying Republicans Ignored Needy People in Budget Fix Is Lazy and Inaccurate

Over the weekend the Fargo Forum editorial board praised Republican budget fix passed during a special session last week. Taking exception to that editorial is state Senator Tyler Axness (D-Fargo) who argues in a rebuttal letter that Republicans ignored the needy by eschewing a Democratic proposal to spend reserve funds on bringing in matching federal

The North Dakota State Capitol stands over the mall July 14, 2016, in Bismarck. Michael Vosburg / Forum News Service

Dustin Gawrylow: Special Session Finishes Kicking the Can Down the Road

This week’s special session was intended to be dull and boring with few surprises allowed to happen. Sure, there was the typical Democratic complaints that the cuts went too far. Democrats actually had a point about Republicans foolishly refusing to find a way to shift $29 million back to human services in order to receive

Memorial Hall in the State Capitol Building in Bismarck, North Dakota

As Special Session Ends It Is Worth Remembering That North Dakota Still Has Plenty of Revenues

State lawmakers finished up their special session in Bismarck today, passing legislation which cuts spending and moves money around to fill a hole in the budget. The reasons for the hole? During North Dakota’s oil boom years lawmakers grew spending about as fast as revenues grew, which was pretty fast. But now the oil boom

Tom Stromme/Bismarck Tribune
Senate Majority Leader Rich Wardner (R-Dickinson) speaks to lawmakers in support of Republican legislation to address the state's budget shortfall during a special session this week. Tom Stromme/Bismarck Tribune

North Dakota Democrats Wanted to Drain North Dakota’s Reserve Funds to Avoid Spending Cuts

As I noted earlier, there was a lot of grandstanding in the state Senate today as Democrats proposed amendments to the Republican budget fix bill which they knew would be rejected, and then subsequently characterized that rejection as Republicans being insufficiently compassionate about the elderly and infirm, etc., etc. Here, from Bismarck Senator Erin Oban,

Eric Hardmeyer, left, president of the Bank of North Dakota speaks with Pam Sharp, director of the Office of Management and Budget, center, and Governor Jack Dalrymple after the governor announced a 4.05 percent cutback in spending for all state agencies to a meeting of directors of state agencies and elected officials on Monday, Feb. 1, 2016, in the Brynhild Haugland Room of the state capitol in Bismarck. Tom Stromme / Bismarck Tribune

North Dakota Lawmakers Have Got to Fix the Revenue Forecasting Problem

Here’s something a lot of people – even those who follow politics in North Dakota closely – don’t understand about our state’s budgeting process. When lawmakers make a budget they aren’t spending money the state has. It’s not like the appropriations they make are drawn on a gigantic state checking account which runs a balance.

Gov. Jack Dalrymple spoke briefly to a joint session of the North Dakota legislative body on Tuesday, August 2, 2016, at the start of a special session of the Legislature. Dalrymple wished the legislators in both bodies well in the effort to fix the budget revenue shortfall. TOM STROMME / Bismarck Tribune

The Real Drama of the Legislature’s Special Session Starts Tomorrow in the House

For those of you who haven’t been following along, here’s what’s happened in North Dakota’s special legislative session so far: Two bills, one Republican and one from Democrats, to delay the construction of the new governor’s residence failed in the Delayed Bills Committee The Republican bill to fix the budget shortfall – one backed by Governor

Eliot Glassheim formally announces his kickoff for his Senate campaign at the town square in Grand Forks, N.D. on July 14, 2016. (Meg Oliphant/Grand Forks Herald)

Five Lawmakers, Including Democratic U.S. Senate Candidate, Miss Roll Call Vote at Special Session

The legislature convened for a special session this morning, and five state lawmakers were absent. At least for the attendance votes in the House and Senate chambers. The most notable absence was Rep. Eliot Glassheim who, in addition to representing District 18 in the state House, is currently the Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate

Governor Jack Dalrymple aknowledges the applause after he delivered his Budget Address to members of the North Dakota legislators and the public in the House chamber Wednesday morning 12-3-2014 at the state Capitol in Bismarck. Behind Dalrymple is Speaker of the House Wes Belter, left, and Lt. Governor Drew Wrigley. MIKE McCLEARY/Bismarck Tribune

Video: Governor Jack Dalrymple Tells Special Session That “Belt Tightening Is the Order of the Day”

This morning Governor Jack Dalrymple addressed the special session of the legislature he convened to address North Dakota’s budget shortfall. “For now belt tightening is the order of the day,” he told a joint session of the state House and Senate. “I’m confident the people of North Dakota will be supportive of the adjustments you

North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple, left, announces on 7-13-2016 his decision to call for a special legislative session for Aug. 2, 2016 from Memorial Hall in the state Capitol in Bismarck, North Dakota. In the background is House Majority Leader Al Carlson, R-Fargo, left, and Senate Majority Leader Rich Wardner, R-Dickinson. Mike McCleary / Bismarck Tribune

Governor Jack Dalrymple Orders Another 2.5 Percent Budget Allotment Worth $152 Million

The special session of the North Dakota legislature called last month by Governor Jack Dalrymple to address budget shortfalls begins tomorrow with an address from Dalrymple itself, but before lawmakers meet the Governor has already ordered a new 2.5 percent across-the-board spending cut for state agencies. This comes on top of the 4.05 percent budget

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