Tag Archives: greg stemen

Greg Stemen, Vice Chairman of the State Board of Higher Education, Stepping Down From Term Early

Greg Stemen, Vice Chairman of the State Board of Higher Education, Stepping Down From Term Early

Greg Stemen, appointed to North Dakota’s State Board of Higher Education by Governor Jack Dalrymple in July of 2015, is ending his tenure on the board early. His four-year term is up in June of next year, but after yesterday’s meeting of the board Stemen submitted a letter of resignation to Chairman Don Morton. I

Leadership in the North Dakota University System Means Pretending Like Nothing Is Wrong

Last month the State Board of Higher Education released a glowing evaluation of North Dakota University System Chancellor Mark Hagerott and voted 7-1 in favor of extending his contract through 2020. Not mentioned in that evaluation is a complaint filed by former Vice Chancellor Lisa Feldner alleging sexist behavior from Hagerott, as well as unequal

Due Process for Me but Not for Thee Says the State Board of Higher Education

I recently published a statement here on SAB from Don Morton and Greg Stemen, the Chairman and Vice Chairman of North Dakota’s State Board of Higher Education respectively. While they don’t mention Chancellor Mark Hagerott and the scandal around him specifically, they’re clearly writing about it, and in their minds Hagerott has been treated unfairly.

Morton and Stemen: Get Both Sides of the Story on the Chancellor

“The truth is rarely pure and never simple.” – Oscar Wilde “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” – attributed to both Winston Churchill and/or Mark Twain “In seeking truth you have to get both sides of the story.” – Walter Cronkite What do

Greg Stemen: Dean Bresciani Must Rise to Expectations

There is a lot of talk surrounding the recent decision to delay the consideration of the contract of President Dean Bresciani of NDSU. This discussion is expected and comes with the territory of being in a position of having high expectations of extremely capable people and having to make difficult decisions in the public eye.

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