Tag Archives: bakken

Landowners Steve and Patty Jensen are shown Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, in their former wheat field near Tioga, N.D., where an oil pipeline spilled 20,600 barrels four years earlier. Amy Dalrymple / Bismarck Tribune

It Turns Out Oil Spills Aren’t the End of the World

It Turns Out Oil Spills Aren’t the End of the World

Reasonable people understand that oil is a product that’s necessary to the quality of life we enjoy today. We all benefit from oil development because we’re all using oil every day of our lives. One day some other energy source, or combination of energy sources, may replace oil. That day is not today, or any

Ryan Zinke, Secretary of the Department of Interior, was keynote speaker Wednesday at the Williston Basin Petroleum Conference in the Bismarck Event Center. Tom Stromme / Bismarck Tribune

Podcast: “We’ve Gone From Surviving to Thriving”

Live on location at the Williston Basin Petroleum Conference yesterday I interviewed a number of people from North Dakota’s oil and gas industry about the state of affairs in the Bakken play. We talked about recovering oil prices, a new sense of optimism, and the challenge of North Dakota’s chronic labor shortages. “We’ve gone from

A gas flare in western North Dakota.

North Dakota’s Flaring Problem Has Its Roots in Excessive Regulation

The environmental activism aimed at impeding, and sometimes even blocking, the build-out of energy infrastructure such as pipelines and refineries/processing plants is bad for the environment. Don’t believe me? Witness the problems the oil and gas industry is having in addressing the flaring issue here in North Dakota. Back in 2014 our state developed, along

A drilling rig is pictured near Lake Sakakawea near New Town, N.D., on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016. Some fear that uncertainty about who owns the minerals under the lake will deter oil development in the area. Amy Dalrymple/Forum News Service

Why Is the North Dakota Land Board Trying to Cost Taxpayers Billions of Dollars?

For some reason Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem’s office is, on behalf of the North Dakota Board of University and School Lands, still fighting to claim mineral rights under Lake Sakajawea. In case you haven’t been following along, here’s some of the back story. Lake Sakajawea is a man-made lake created when the federal government damned

File Photo: Flares and lights from oil wells dot the horizon on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, just over the Missouri River from New Town, North Dakota November 1, 2014. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen/File Photo

Double Taxing the Oil Industry Is a Good Way for the Three Affiliated Tribes to Lose a Lot of Money

UPDATE: A reader points out that the Three Affiliated Tribes owns their own oil development company called Missouri River Resources. That seems like a very big conflict of interest. A tribal-owned oil company is going to be operating at a distinct advantage under a dual state-and-tribal tax regime. Back during their 2015 session North Dakota lawmakers removed

Mark Zuckerberg Visited North Dakota’s Oil Patch and Found an Undeniable Truth About Oil: We Need It

Earlier this week Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg visited Williston, North Dakota. He specifically took a close look at the oil industry there, coordinating with the North Dakota Petroleum Council to visit an oil rig. He also discussed life in the oil patch with a group of residents there, then wrote about it. On Facebook, naturally.

Crews work at an oil well site near Williston, N.D., on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Amy Dalrymple/Forum News Service

There Was Never a Bust: North Dakota’s Oil Industry Is More Efficient, More Resilient Than Ever Before

“A Shale-Oil Boomtown Climbs Back From the Bust” That was a headline from the Wall Street Journal over the weekend. It was an article, focused on Watford City in McKenzie County, describing about oil jobs and oil activity rebounding. The rebound is very good news, and a story worth telling, but I take issue with describing the

Rigging equipment is pictured in a field on June 4, 2015. REUTERS / Cooper Neill

North Dakota Oil Producers Helped Topple OPEC

OPEC, the global oil cartel which worked to  fix prices for the benefit of its members, is dead. So writes Pascal-Emanuel Gobry in The Week. The group isn’t officially dead, but they’ve lost their ability to dominate the global oil markets. The reason? Shale oil, particularly here in the United States. Fracking has “massively expanded oil

An explosion from an oil train derailment near Casselton, North Dakota, in December, 2013. Courtesy Loren Parks

It’s Almost Like Building Pipelines Like DAPL Leads to Safer Transportation of Oil or Something

Remember over the last few years when the enemies of oil development were hyping oil train derailments? To be fair those derailments – some of them hugely explosive and damaging, some even costing people their lives – were a legitimate thing to be concerned about. But when some, including this observer, argued that the solution

Stacked rigs and other idle oil equipment is seen in a Nabors Drilling yard near Williston, North Dakota April 30, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen/File Photo

Reform to North Dakota’s Oil Spill Guidelines Is Imperfect but an Improvement Over the Status Quo

The problem with a lot of the reporting on oil spills in North Dakota is that it tends to lump all spills of all sizes together into one uniform number. As if all spills were created equal. But that’s just not the case. Most spills are very small. Most spills are entirely contained and have

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