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Democrat Jon Ossoff addresses his supporters after his defeat Tuesday, June 20, 2017, in Georgia's 6th Congressional District special election in Atlanta, Georgia. Chris Aluka Berry / Reuters

Where Is This Wave of Anti-Trump Backlash We Were Promised?

Where Is This Wave of Anti-Trump Backlash We Were Promised?

As I’m sure you know by now, Republican Karen Handel beat Democrat Jon Ossoff in a special election in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District last night. She will be the first Republican woman sent to the U.S. House from Georgia. Not that you’ll hear much hype about that since Republican women breaking glass ceilings is different.

Stenehjem Protects the Separation of Powers

“All sides are gonna be pissed at Wayne,” a political friend texted me yesterday upon news of Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem’s opinion (see below) on the legality of some of Governor Doug Burgum’s vetoes issued earlier this year. “Nobody got everything they wanted.” That’s true. As you can see from this key excerpt, Stenehjem upheld

This Nov. 9, 2010, photo shows the University of North Dakota's Fighting Sioux logo in front of the Ralph Engelstad Arena in Grand Forks, N.D. (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack)

That Supreme Court Ruling Won’t Change a Thing With the Fighting Sioux Nickname Controversy

The U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling today regarding offensive trademarks, and now some supporters of the University of North Dakota’s retired Fighting Sioux nickname are saying it gives them new hope that their beloved logo/nickname might be restored. They’re wrong. The Supreme Court case really isn’t related at all. The SCOTUS opinion in question

James Hodgkinson of Belleville, Illinois is seen in this undated photo posted on his social media account. Social Media via REUTERS

The Partisan Shooting of Rep. Scalise Is a Relatively New Thing in the History of American Political Violence

“Try to find the humanity in the people you disagree with.” That’s what I wrote in my Sunday print column this week. The subject, of course, was the shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise and three others. In the New York Times today Ross Douthat has some thoughts on why the motivations of James Hodgkinson, the

Megyn Kelly’s Critics Look Foolish Now That Her Alex Jones Interview Has Aired

Last week there was a lot of anger directed at Megyn Kelly and NBC News for their decision to broadcast an interview with rabid conspiracy theorist and Trump ally Alex Jones. “The censorious powers of the heckler’s veto have evolved now to the point that people are willing to call for the banning and shunning

Elections, Not Political Deal Making, Should Earn Democrats Control of Committees

North Dakota Democrats hold just 22 seats out of 141 in the state Legislature. Because of this, during the regular legislative session, Democrats chair no committees. In fact, they don’t really have enough elected members of the Legislature to even cover all committee assignments. That’s as it should be. If Democrats want to control committees

Don’t Let Local Property Tax Hikes Be Automatic

“City property taxes are going to go up.” That’s what Blake Crosby, executive director of the North Dakota League of Cities, told me during a radio interview this week. His argument is that lawmakers dabbled in property tax policy, implementing buy downs of local property taxes funded by statewide surpluses, but did so without an

Stained glass window in memory of John Merriam, who was Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives and father of William Merriam, who was elected Governor of Minnesota in 1888, in St. Paul's Church-on-the-Hill, 1524 Summit Avenue, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016. Scott Takushi / Pioneer Press

Why Shouldn’t We Have Free Speech in Church?

The Trump administration has been signaling their intent to roll back what’s called the Johnson Amendment. Essentially federal policies which prohibits 501(c)3 non-profit groups, including religious organizations like churches, from endorsing candidates. “Free speech shouldn’t stop at the door of our churches, synagogues and places of worship,” Vice President Mike Pence said at the annual meeting

igns left by protesters demonstrating against the Energy Transfer Partners Dakota Access oil pipeline sit at the gate of a construction access road where construction has been stopped for several weeks due to the protests near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S. September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen

Court Ruling in Favor of #NoDAPL Activists Illustrates Everything That’s Wrong With the Federal Regulatory Regime

Oil has been flowing through the much-contested Dakota Access Pipeline for about two months now. Energy Transfer Partners, which built the pipeline, achieved that goal after clearing years of regulatory hurdles and legal folderol. But yesterday federal Judge James Boasberg issued a ruling that, while rejecting most of the legal arguments made against the pipeline by

Audio: Cities Representative Said Legislature Had No “Exit Strategy” From Property Tax Buydowns

“City property taxes are going to go up.” That’s what Blake Crosby, executive director of the North Dakota League of Cities, told me on air yesterday. “It depends on the particular city,”  he added, “but generally speaking yes they’re going to have to.” He blamed the Legislature for the increases. He said that state lawmakers

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