Tag Archives: transparency

Attorney General: City Violated Open Meetings Law by Holding Council Meeting Out of Town

Attorney General: City Violated Open Meetings Law by Holding Council Meeting Out of Town

Often entities of North Dakota’s government, particularly local governments and committees and agencies, hold meetings far from their usual place of business. I’ve been critical of this practice in the past, such as when a board at North Dakota State University decided to hold an annual meeting in Minneapolis. How can a meeting of a

The North Dakota Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee is working on a bill that relates to high-level radioactive waste storage and disposal. Mike McCleary / Bismarck Tribune

Legislature Should Consider Using Existing Platforms for Video of Committee Meetings

Several years ago the North Dakota Legislature implemented a video system for floor sessions in the House and Senate chambers. I should pause here to note that, with this blog celebrating its 16th birthday yesterday, I’ve been around long enough to remember when we only had an audio stream of floor sessions. Through RealPlayer which,

Former Fargo Park District executive director Joel Vettel

North Dakota’s Public Officials Should Be Required to Record Meetings Even When They’re Closed to the Public

Most of you reading this probably don’t live in Fargo, so you might not much care that the local park board there violated open meetings law, but if you’re a resident of North Dakota you should be paying attention because how this situation is being handled could very well be how some government entity in

The City of Minot

It Should Be Illegal for a City to Hold an “Open Meeting” in Another City

Last year the City of Minot held a “retreat” in the City of Washburn, a town roughly an hour south along Highway 83. This “retreat” was also, supposedly, an open meeting at which public business was discuss. Including a hot-button issue related to the city doubling the cost of building permits for people living in

ND State Capitol (Korrie Wenzel/Grand Forks Herald)

North Dakota Politics Needs More Transparency, Not an Ethics Committee

This Fargo Forum editorial over the weekend struck the right tone on the need for more transparency when it comes to the financial interests of state lawmakers (and probably other elected officials too). It was based on a report by my colleague John Hageman which found that a few state lawmakers are, in addition to holding

The Richland County Courthouse on Friday, October 3, 2014. Carrie Snyder / The Forum

North Dakota Courts Should Approve Mandate for Online Access to Records

I support a new rule proposed for the North Dakota court system which would require that public records be available to the public for online access. You should too. The state Supreme Court is currently accepting public comment on a new rule, to be called Administrative Rule 41, which among other things would mandate the

UND athletic director Brian Faison listens to president Mark Kennedy during a press conference Tuesday morning, Oct. 17, at the High Performance Center. Faison announced his retirement effective December 31, 2017, after which he will serve as a consultant to the Athletics department until June of 2018. Nick Nelson / Grand Forks Herald

UND Spent Over $16,000 on Consulting in Athletics Department Which Produced No Written Reports

Brian Faison, the Athletics Director at the University of North Dakota, retired earlier this week. Only my colleague, Grand Forks Herald sports reporter Tom Miller, doesn’t buy that it was a retirement. In a column he opines that Faison was pushed out and the university is keeping it quiet. Miller notes that UND hired a consultant

Governor Doug Burgum speaks as Lt. Governor Brent Sanford looks on. Michael Vosburg / Forum News Service

In Defense of the Smoky Back Room

The Bismarck Tribune today, in an editorial, blisters Governor Doug Burgum for holding a closed-door meeting with oil and gas industry leaders to talk about pipeline safety. “When Gov. Doug Burgum took office we knew he would take a different approach to government,” the Tribune writes. “Unfortunately, that includes excluding the public from discussions that directly impact

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