Tag Archives: transparency

UND athletic director Brian Faison listens to president Mark Kennedy during a press conference Tuesday morning, Oct. 17, at the High Performance Center. Faison announced his retirement effective December 31, 2017, after which he will serve as a consultant to the Athletics department until June of 2018. Nick Nelson / Grand Forks Herald

UND Spent Over $16,000 on Consulting in Athletics Department Which Produced No Written Reports

Brian Faison, the Athletics Director at the University of North Dakota, retired earlier this week. Only my colleague, Grand Forks Herald sports reporter Tom Miller, doesn’t buy that it was a retirement. In a column he opines that Faison was pushed out and the university is keeping it quiet. Miller notes that UND hired a consultant

Governor Doug Burgum speaks as Lt. Governor Brent Sanford looks on. Michael Vosburg / Forum News Service

In Defense of the Smoky Back Room

The Bismarck Tribune today, in an editorial, blisters Governor Doug Burgum for holding a closed-door meeting with oil and gas industry leaders to talk about pipeline safety. “When Gov. Doug Burgum took office we knew he would take a different approach to government,” the Tribune writes. “Unfortunately, that includes excluding the public from discussions that directly impact

North Dakota Republicans Introduce Their Own Campaign Transparency Legislation

Earlier this week Democrats announced a group of bills aimed at making politics in North Dakota more transparent. And most of the proposals, outside of yet another push for an ethics commission, are good ideas. Former state Rep. Ed Gruchalla showed us yesterday just how Democrats intend to use an ethics commission, proving just how terrible

Democratic House Minority Leader Corey Mock

North Dakota Democrats Have Some Good Ideas on Transparency and Accountability Laws

The North Dakota Democratic party, already marginalized by voters in state politics, suffered even more devastating losses this last election day. In addition to losing every single statewide election by a landslide – not a single one of their candidates got even 30 percent of the vote – they lost seven seats in the state

State Rep. Corey Mock speaks during a floor session of the North Dakota House of Representatives in 2015.

Audio: Legislative Leader Talks Transparency, Says Dems Shouldn’t Change Even After Election Losses

On my radio show yesterday I had on state Rep. Corey Mock who, earlier this month, was elected as Minorityh Leader for his party’s caucus in the Legislature. I had him on to talk about transparency legislation. Mock has made transparency and ethics a priority during his legislative career and while I think some of his

North Dakota Governor-elect Doug Burgum embraces his fiancee, Kathryn Helgaas, at the close of his acceptance speech Tuesday, Nov.8, 2016, at the Sanctuary Events Center in downtown Fargo. David Samson / The Forum

The Key to Addressing Burgum’s Business Interests Is Transparency

At the national level voters elected Donald J. Trump to the White House. Here in North Dakota voters elected Doug Burgum to be our state’s 33rd governor. One thing both of these men have in common are extensive private sector business interests. At the national level there is much media hand-wringing and partisan rancor over

North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum delivers his first public address by way of a video posted on platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

The Media Don’t Care About Your Access So Much as They Care About Their Access

On North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum’s first day in office he sent out video message to the public by way of platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Today the Associated Press published a gripe about politicians who use social media to bypass journalists and control their message, and they cite Burgum’s video message as an

FILE PHOTO: Chancellor Mark Hagerott of the North Dakota University System. (Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald)

University System Should Get Open Records Exemption for President Applications

Over the years of writing this blog I developed something of a reputation as a strong supporter of open records and open meetings. So when the North Dakota University System – an organization with an unfortunate history of violating our state’s transparency laws – began making noises about getting an exemption from the state’s open

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