Tag Archives: property rights

No hunting and no trespassing signs could become a thing of the past under a bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature. But many conflicts remain to be resolved over Senate Bill 2315. Jenny Schlecht / Forum News Service

If Hunting Groups Keep Winning Political Battles Over Posting Land They Could Lose the War

If Hunting Groups Keep Winning Political Battles Over Posting Land They Could Lose the War

As it was originally introduced, SB2315 would have ended the presumption of open access to rural land for activities like hunting. Under current law, if property owners like farmers and ranchers don’t want want the public on their land they have to post it as closed. The intent of SB2315 was to turn that requirement

(North Dakota Game and Fish Department photo)

The Legislature Must Recognize That the Land Doesn’t Belong to the Hunters

I’ve written a lot about SB2315, introduced by Senator Robert Erbele (R-Lehr), which would flip North Dakota’s presumption of land access. Currently everyone, at any time, is presumed to have access to rural lands in the absence of signs posting it as off limits. Outdoors enthusiasts, hunters in particular, see this status quo as a boon

(N.D. Game and Fish Department photo)

Tyler Lannoye: Bill Is Pro-Property Rights, Not Anti-Hunting

This guest post was submitted by Tyler Lannoye, an outdoor sports enthusiast and resident of Churchs Ferry, North Dakota. I am not a landowner. I am a lifelong resident of North Dakota and a sportsman. I am a member of my local sportsmen’s clubs and I donate money, time, guns and resources to promote youth hunting

Matt Gade/Forum News Service file photo

North Dakota Property Owners Shouldn’t Have to Post Their Land to Control Access

There were hundreds of arrests made during the violent protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline a couple of years back, but I’m sure you readers noticed that the charges behind many of those arrests didn’t stick. That’s because the bulk of those charges were related to trespassing, and North Dakota has some very antiquated trespass

Macy Hornung was asked to leave Fargo’s new Chick-fil-A restaurant for breast-feeding her 7-month-old daughter, Ziggy, setting off a social media firestorm. David Samson / The Forum

Can the Government Force Private Property Owners to Allow Breastfeeding?

In Fargo there is controversy over a nursing mother who was asked to leave a Chick-fil-A restaurant. Media reporting on incident references a state law, passed during the 2009 session, which protections the right of mothers to breastfeed on public property or on private property that’s open to the public. Here’s the specific language from

Dancers make their way around the arena at the Cannon Ball Flag Celebration during President Barack Obama's visit to Cannon Ball, N.D. on Friday, June 13, 2014. (Kevin Cederstrom/Forum News Service)

Real Sovereignty for Native Americans Would Mean Property Rights and Policy Autonomy

“The Loophole Economy Is No Jackpot for Indians” is the headline to a Wall Street Journal article from yesterday written by Naomi Schaefer Riley, author of The New Trail of Tears: How Washington Is Destroying American Indians, which you can purchase from Amazon at this link. I’m buying a copy as soon as I’m done

A visitor takes in the view from Buck Hill in Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Photo courtesy of North Dakota Tourism

So We Shouldn't Build A Refinery Because Someone Had Their Ashes Spread Nearby?

“Refinery in view of Sheila Schafer’s resting place,” reads the headline from Lauren Donovan in the Bismarck Tribune. Sheila Schafer, for those of you who are unaware, was a long-time booster for Medora-area tourism (and stepmother to former Governor Ed Schafer). Her ashes were spread on top of Buck Hill, a popular spot in the Theodore Roosevelt

Civil Asset Forfeiture Is Evil

If you’ve been seeing headlines about something called “civil asset forfeiture” and wondered what all the fuss is about, you could do worse than John Oliver’s report above. It’s funny, and would be funnier if the subject matter weren’t so gob-smackingly vile. Basically, civil asset forfeiture is a process through which the police can seize

On Television: Can We Protect Property Rights And The Environment At The Same Time?

) I was on Chris Berg’s 6:30 Point of View program last night debating the “extraordinary places” regulations proposed to the North Dakota Industrial Commission by Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem. The commission adopted the policy, but only for public lands, leaving private lands free. On the show, columnist Clay Jenkinson argued for the inclusion of

We Should Allow Public Comment Before Journalists Can Exercise 1st Amendment Rights

The reliably left-wing Grand Forks Herald editorial board poo-poos the idea that “extraordinary places” regulations passed by the State Industrial Commission would place unfair delays on the development of privately owned property. The point here is not that North Dakota should zone the “extraordinary places” being considered by the Industrial Commission (and written about by two

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