New York Investigation Finds Fraudulent Voters Allowed To Cast Ballots 97% Of The Time

In a recently published report, authorities New York’s Department of Investigations found they were able to cast fraudulent ballots in elections 97% of the time they tried.

But remember, folks, if you’re for voter ID laws you’re a dirty, dirty racist.

DOI undercover agents showed up at 63 polling places last fall and pretended to be voters who should have been turned away by election officials; the agents assumed the names of individuals who had died or moved out of town, or who were sitting in jail. In 61 instances, or 97 percent of the time, the testers were allowed to vote. Those who did vote cast only a write-in vote for a “John Test” so as to not affect the outcome of any contest. DOI published its findings two weeks ago in a searing 70-page report accusing the city’s Board of Elections of incompetence, waste, nepotism, and lax procedures.

Election officials reacted with shock, and promised reviews of the balloting process. Oh wait, no they didn’t. They claimed nothing is wrong and accused the investigators of committing a felony.

Greg Soumas, president of New York’s BOE, offered a justification for calling in the prosecutors: “If something was done in an untoward fashion, it was only done by DOI. We (are) unaware of any color of authority on the part of (DOI) to vote in the identity of any person other than themselves — and our reading of the election law is that such an act constitutes a felony.”

We’re told all the time that vote fraud doesn’t happen. And yet, when authorities actually look for vote fraud, they find it. Every single time.

Is there a lot of vote fraud? We don’t know. But even if the rate of fraud is insignificant, the system is vulnerable. Do we want to wait until after there’s major fraud that turns an election before we do something about it?

Maybe it’s time to set aside the political hyperbole and get serious about protecting the ballot box.

Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com, a columnist for the Forum News Service, and host of the Plain Talk Podcast which you can subscribe to by clicking here.

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