If Grocery Clerks Can Work During the Pandemic, So Can Teachers

A school bus drive by Washington Elementary in north Fargo on Wednesday, April 1, as Fargo Public Schools started their home schooling distance education programs. David Samson / The Forum

MINOT, N.D. — Can you imagine where we would be right now without the men and women working the tills and stocking the shelves in our grocery stores?

Not to mention every other person up and down our supply chains who have helped keep Americans fed with only a few minor speed bumps and inconveniences?

How about the service people? Since the pandemic began, I’ve had to call out for repairs for my air conditioning and Internet service.

I have four people in my household working and schooling. We need our Internet connection, and it helps if the house isn’t the temperature of a sauna.

I had some trouble with my car last month. I had to take it to my mechanic. I’m thankful he was still working.

The pandemic has cost a lot of people their jobs. It’s altered work habits for many more. Still, for some people, essential people who do indispensable but often overlooked jobs, their responsibilities never really changed.

I’ve been thinking about that a lot in the context of reopening our schools which, like so many things in our society, has become a question that divides us along partisan lines.

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Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com, a columnist for the Forum News Service, and host of the Plain Talk Podcast which you can subscribe to by clicking here.

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